Newark Liberty Int’l Airport (EWR)

Newark Liberty International Airport, which straddles the boundary between the cities of Newark and Elizabeth  in New Jersey, is one of three major airports serving the New York metropolitan area, the others being John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia. However, despite being only 40% JFK’s size, the airport handles almost as many flights. When first built in 1928, it was the first major airport serving the New York metropolitan area and was actually the busiest commercial airport in the world until LaGuardia opened in 1939. During World War II, Newark was operated by the Army Air Corps, and since 1948, it has been operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which added an instrument runway, terminal building, control tower, and air cargo center. As of 2017, EWR was the 6th-busiest airport in the U.S. by international passenger traffic, the 15th-busiest overall, and the 43rd-busiest in the world. The airport serves 50 carriers, the largest tenants of which are United Airlines and FedEx Express. The airport’s original Art Deco-style Central Terminal building, adorned with murals by the Abstract Expressionist painter Arshile Gorky, was dedicated by Amelia Earhart in 1935.

After the 9/11 attacks of 2001, which saw the hijacking and crash of United Airlines Flight 93 while en route to  San Francisco from Newark, the airport’s name was changed from Newark International Airport to Newark Liberty International Airport, in tribute to the victims of the attacks, as well as in reference to the Statue of Liberty, which is located just 7 miles to the east.

  • Visited: Oct 2014
  • National Register of Historic Places: 1979 (original 1935 Metropolitan Airport Administration Building)

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